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1099B numerous transactions; can I report the totals rather than data entry?

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Level 2

I see that the 8949 does not automatically print any longer.  I have 100+ stock trades, all with basis reported to IRS

Must I date entry every single transaction?

Can't I just enter total long term, total short term, total basis, total proceeds ?  By each brokerage statement?  and leave the actual dates blank? 

Thanks for any advice; it is all so laborious

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Level 2

I always include short term and long term totals on Schedule D and than attach the detail from the brokerage statement to Form 8453 and send mail to IRS.  Form 8453 instructions has the address.  

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Level 9
Level 9

Yes you can enter short term covered totals, short term non covered totals, long term covered totals and long term non covered totals.  For the non covered totals you will want to scan and attached the detail to the return.

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Level 15

And yet how many folks are still standing out in front of Intuit headquarters with their torches and pitchforks because the import function isn't working properly 😕

ex-AllStar, ex-Lutefisk taste taster, ex-ACME product tester
and ex marks the spot where those rocks and anvils hit me.
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Level 2

I always include short term and long term totals on Schedule D and than attach the detail from the brokerage statement to Form 8453 and send mail to IRS.  Form 8453 instructions has the address.  

View solution in original post

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Level 2

Thank you

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Level 15

all with basis reported to IRS, said the OP.

@cglav I always include short term and long term totals on Schedule D and than attach the detail from the brokerage statement to Form 8453 and send mail to IRS 

Then you are wasting time, paper, postage, storage place in Houston, etc. 

IF they are covered transactions, nothing needs to be sent.  And rather than mailing WHEN there are non-covered transactions... scanning & attaching is a much better alternative for the environment (especially since the consensus is that the IRS *never* looks at the F 8453 & attachments anyway.

Former Chump... umm.... AllStar.
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Level 2

Too many pages for my scanner technology, after i scan i would have to convert each page to a .pdf, way too time consuming.   If not for that I would attach them to the return.  

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Level 15

Why not attach as a pdf and efile?


ex-AllStar
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Level 8

i just do what @sjrcpa  said.  Scan a .pdf...attach the file thru the E-file option.....when you attach, you chose the 8949 option on the dropdown....and bingo.

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Level 15

scanning & attaching is a much better alternative

I suggested that... but s/he doesn't have the "technology" to do so efficiently.

Former Chump... umm.... AllStar.
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Level 15

Form 8949 isn't required for covered transactions.

Former Chump... umm.... AllStar.
If a post answers your question, click on *Accept as solution* for future searches