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When the birthday of a taxpayer is January 1,,, the program will produce an age one year in advance of actual age.

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Level 1
last updated ‎December 07, 2019 4:39 AM
 
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Level 10
last updated ‎December 07, 2019 4:39 AM

Yeah, somebody at the IRS was mathematically challenged when they came up with this.  Your birthday is actually the day before you were born.  Go figure.  See page 2, table 1 (2018):

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf

" If you were born before January 2, 1954, you're considered to be 65 or older at the end of 2018"

It applies to other things too but this was the first thing I found in google.

Rick

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Level 15
Level 15
last updated ‎December 07, 2019 4:39 AM
I feel like I've heard something odd happening when you have a Jan 1st date of birth...

♪♫•*¨*•.¸¸♥Lisa♥¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪
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Level 8
last updated ‎December 07, 2019 4:39 AM
There is an IRS Regulation about dob.
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Level 10
last updated ‎December 07, 2019 4:39 AM

Yeah, somebody at the IRS was mathematically challenged when they came up with this.  Your birthday is actually the day before you were born.  Go figure.  See page 2, table 1 (2018):

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p501.pdf

" If you were born before January 2, 1954, you're considered to be 65 or older at the end of 2018"

It applies to other things too but this was the first thing I found in google.

Rick

View solution in original post

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